The Pain in Dysmenorrhea

Knowing its Causes and Treatment

Dysmenorrhea or pain during menstruation is one of the most common afflictions that affect women. For some it may only be a mild discomfort. However, for others, it can be a disabling condition. Pain in dysmenorrhea is often described as dull and cramping in the lower abdomen, particularly in the pelvic area and happens right before or during menstruation. The pain may be limited to the abdominal area or may radiate to other parts of the body particularly the lower back and thighs. Dysmenorrhea disappears in the latter of part of the menses or after taking analgesics such as NSAIDs.
Dysmenorrhea is caused by the contraction of the uterus during menstruation. The uterus is composed of three layers: the endometrium, the myometrium, and the perimetrium. During the menstrual cycle, the endometrium, the innermost layer, thickens and becomes highly vascularized in response to different hormones. Eventually, this layer gets sloughed off during menstruation. The myometrium, which is primarily made up of smooth muscles, contracts to help shed off the thickened layer. Sometimes the contractions are too strong, causing the pain associated with menstrual pain.
Abdominal pain is the most prominent symptom of dysmenorrhea. Often it is described as dull and aching; however some women also experience a crushing or stabbing pain. In many cases, this may be the only discomfort felt. However, in women with moderate to severe pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea may also happen. Pallor, clammy skin, and dizziness also occur, particularly in those who experience severe menstrual cramping. In a few cases, dehydration may also set in, causing weakness, dry lips, and thirst.
Causes of dysmenorrhea are varied. One of the most common causes includes hormonal imbalance and endometriosis, or the growth endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Fibroid growths, an over thickened endometrium, or the presence of contraceptive objects inside the uterus can also cause pain during menstruation. In a significant number of women, particularly adolescents, no exact cause for dysmenorrhea can be pinpointed. In many cases, pain during menstruation disappears once they enter their twenties or after giving birth. Dysmenorrhea is more likely to occur in women who have a family history of dysmenorrhea, those who have never been pregnant, those who smoke, and those who started menstruating at an early age. Dysmenorrhea at an older age is relatively uncommon and should be investigated for possible gynecological problems.
Dysmenorrhea can be easily managed at home. NSAIDS such as mefenamic acid are effective in controlling the pain. Rest, lower back massages, and warm compress have also been effective home remedies. Antispasmodics to relax the uterine muscles may also be administered alone or together with pain medications. In addition, oral contraceptive pills are often prescribed for those who suffer heavy and painful bleeding due to hormonal imbalance. These pills prevent ovulation and the oversecretion of certain hormones. For those who frequently experience severe unrelenting pain or have associated heavy menstrual bleeding, an ultrasound of the pelvic area is often requested to rule out any abnormal growths. Aside from medicines, surgery may be indicated for women who have uterine growths.

Knowing About Menstrual Cramps

What Causes Them and How They are Managed

Menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea is pain felt in the pelvic area before or during menstruation. The pain is usually described as dull and diffused. Often times it is described as throbbing, squeezing, or cramping. Severity can vary from woman to woman. For some it’s only a mild discomfort but for others it becomes a severe unbearable pain. The pain usually responds to over-the-counter pain relievers or will spontaneously resolve once menstruation stops.
To understand more about menstrual cramps, one must be familiar with the structure of the uterus. The uterus is one of the female organs of reproduction. In non-pregnant women, it is usually the size of a fist and is located behind the urinary bladder, in front of the rectum, and has three layers. The inner layer is called the endometrium. In response to the body’s hormones, this layer thickens every menstrual cycle. If no pregnancy happens, most of this layer is shed off during menses. The muscular middle layer is the myometrium and is primarily responsible for contracting the uterus during menstruation and childbirth. Sometimes the contractions become too strong, causing the pain in menstrual cramps. The outermost layer is the perimetrium and is mostly composed of fibrous tissue.
The main symptom of menstrual cramps is pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen. The pain may be limited to the pelvic area or may radiate to other parts of the body such as the upper abdomen, waist, thigh, and back. Aside from pain, nausea, vomiting and loose stools may also occur. Because of the vomiting and loose stools, dehydration and electrolyte problems can happen. These manifest as weakness, headaches, and dizziness. Pallor and sweating also happen, particularly if the pain is quite severe.
There are many possible causes of menstrual cramps. In many cases, there is usually no underlying cause that can be identified. Some of the known conditions that cause cramping during menstruation include endometriosis, uterine growths, hormonal imbalance, and mal-positioning of the uterus. Younger women and those who have not given birth are particularly prone to menstrual cramps. In addition, menstrual pain is also associated with smoking and irregular menstruation. Severe bleeding and severe cramping or pain outside menstruation is usually a cause for concern and should be checked by a physician.
Treatment of menstrual cramps will depend on what is causing the pain. Usually, mild or moderate pain can be managed at home with rest and pain medications such as NSAIDS and acetaminophen. Sometimes anti-spasmodics such as Buscopan can be given to relax the uterine muscles and relieve the pain. Those with severe menstrual cramps or hormonal imbalance can be put on hormone therapy. This will help prevent ovulation and lessen the severity of the pain. If menstrual cramps cannot be controlled by medications or is associated with heavy bleeding, diagnostic procedures may be needed to find out if there is an underlying condition. Imaging studies can reveal intrauterine growths, endometriosis, or other uterine abnormalities. Surgery is usually done to remove growths.

Gall Bladder Stones Formation

What are the causes and how to deal with them?

The Gall bladder is home to many substances which tend to lump together to form one big stone or several smaller ones. These substances, according to the Medical Dictionary, are usually composed of cholesterol, calcium carbonate, and calcium bilirubinate. We hear about cholesterol but do we know what it really is? It’s a fat produced by the liver. Calcium carbonate comes from the foods that we ate. And calcium bilirubinate is a bile pigment. Gall bladder stones formation is the most common gall disorder. Most gall bladder stones formation doesn’t pose any problem and people go about it without feeling any pain, but others may feel painful episodes which may require medication. Most problems occur when a stone blocks a duct and bile is unable to enter the small intestine. Surgery is usually recommended for the removal of gall bladder stones. More women suffer from gall bladder stones than men.

 

Under the liver there’s a small gland that helps in the synthesis of fat. This is the gall bladder. It’s encased by the peritoneum which is a liquefied membrane that covers the abdominal cavity and the organs found in it.  The gall bladder and pancreas are separated by the duodenum. While it rests on top of the duodenum, the pancreas is found under the duodenum. Both contribute to the digestion of food in the small intestine.

 

What are some of the precursors of gallbladder stones formation?
One condition that leads to gall bladder stones formation is obesity. Obese people have an abundant supply of cholesterol which combines with the bile.
Women who are taking contraceptive pills are also prone to gall bladder stones formation. Contraceptive pills increase cholesterol production in the liver which is one of the precursors of gallstones. The association of gall bladder stones formation and contraceptive pills is perceived to be in that area.
People who love to eat fatty food.
Others include inheritance, losing weight, being over 60 years old and diabetes.
There are several more conditions that cause gall bladder stones formation
Some of the symptoms of gall bladder stones formation include painful episodes in the upper part of the abdomen which may include the middle and right portions. The pain may start as a dull feeling which may develop quickly. The pain may also develop between the shoulder blades in some instances which may also be felt under the right shoulder portion. Nausea and vomiting are associated with it.

 

Eating a low fat diet will help in preventing gall bladder stones formation. Eating alkaline foods and drinking alkaline drinks will also help dissolve gallstones. Lemonades, green tea, apple cider are some of the drinks that are helpful in eliminating gallstones. Drinking a lot of water will help flush toxins in the gall bladder and help in preventing gall bladder stones formation.

 

There are many other home natural remedies that’ll help in preventing and dissolving gall bladder stones formation. If there’s too much pain, however, a doctor’s visit is highly recommended.

 

The Dangers of Fallopian Tube Infection!

There are several reasons why a fallopian tube gets infected. Fallopian tube infection is also called salpingitis. There is a chronic form of fallopian tube infection and there is also an acute form. The infections are brought about by different kinds of organisms, each with varying effects. A fallopian tube infection can be an isolated case or part of a larger pelvic inflammatory disease.

The fallopian tube is part of a woman’s reproductive system with one being on each side of the uterus. They’re also known by other names such as oviduct or uterine tube. They connect the ovary to the uterus and part of the egg cell fertilization develops in the fallopian tube as it travels towards the uterus where it’s ultimately embedded. Each fallopian tube measures approximately 10 to 13 cm long and has a diameter of 0.5 to 1.2 cm.  You can observe how narrow the lumens are and any fallopian tube infection that may arise will definitely hamper the egg cell’s passage towards the uterus. This may cause an ectopic pregnancy where the fertilized egg cell is trapped inside the fallopian tube and grows inside it.

Infection get to the reproductive organs and ultimately to the fallopian tube through several ways and means. Abortion can bring on a fallopian tube infection. This is a rare occurrence, especially if done in aseptic conditions of clinics and hospitals. It’s a different story when it’s illegally done. Appendicitis, when it ruptures, may also cause fallopian tube infection. The pus and other tissues spread to the abdominal cavity will definitely infect all the organs, including the fallopian tube, unless it’s thoroughly cleaned. Miscarriage and childbirth are also risk along with an IUD insertion; sexual intercourse with a person having STDs may also bring fallopian tube infection.

Mild fallopian tube infection may not show signs or symptoms. This is bad since your fallopian tube may get irreversibly damaged without you knowing it. What are some of the signs and symptoms linked to fallopian tube infection?

  • Foul smelling vaginal secretions
  • Agonizing pain during sexual intercourse
  • Painful menstrual period with pain felt in both sides of the abdomen
  • Pain is common during ovulation period
  • Lower back pain
  • Fever
  • Frequent urination

Treatment includes taking antibiotics to fight the infection. Water or juice, not too sweet, will help cool the body and flush out the pathogens. Complete bed rest is advised. It may be that several organisms are causing the fallopian tube infection; you may have to take several kinds of antibiotics at the same time. And take them according to schedule and finish the entire course up to the end.

If the situation is really bad, the doctor may opt for surgery. Of course this is always the last recourse, but it’s not impossible. As much as possible the doctor will want to save your fallopian tube. And what’s worse is if the prognosis is really bad your ovaries may have to be removed as well. Early checkups and detection is crucial if you are planning to have kids or add more kids in your family.

Know More What Appendicitis is All About!

 You may find this article helpful if  suffering from Appendicitis !

 

According to science, one of the most useless body appendages that we have is the appendix. Although there are results from recent researches that point otherwise, the notion still persists. Whether it’s useless or not, when appendicitis attacks, that’s the inflammation of the tissues of the appendix, you will feel its pain with agonizing consequence. You won’t be able to do much but lie down and wait till the pain dies down. According to some reliable sources, the incidence of appendicitis yearly is about 250 000 cases. The same source mentioned that men suffer more than women, but there are more women that undergo appendectomy than men.

The appendix is right where the small and large intestine meet at the lower right side of our abdomen. That’s all there is to it concerning where we can find it. It’s worm like and can vary from 2 to 22 cm in length with an average of 11 cm.  Its diameter is commonly pegged at 7 to 8 cm. There are several theories concerning its function, but those are for another article.

Infection is the usual suspect that leads to appendicitis. Wastes travel from the stomach to the small intestine and find their way to the large intestine. Because of the junction where the appendix is, it’s ideally located for some germs to make a detour, finding their way inside the appendix to produce an infection. And also in the same manner, appendicitis may also happen when some feces are also dumped there, causing an obstruction in the process. The belief that one must rest after eating in order to prevent food from entering the appendix is very popular among many people around the world. This may have some scientific basis after all.

Appendicitis is characterized by excruciating pain. This lingers in the navel portion in the lower abdominal region and radiates downward to the lower right portion of the abdomen. The patients may also take the fetal position and any attempt to straighten them out will only result in aggravating appendicitis pain. There’s tenderness in the affected area and inflammation and redness is very imminent.  Pushing the affected part will not cause any pain but once you withdraw your finger it might be met from a howl from the patient. The appendix will appear swollen and full of pus.

There are home measures which will help in dealing with appendicitis without resorting to surgical operation. One is eating food which facilitates easy bowel movement. This method tries to flush the feces out of the body while lessening the chance of retaining any of them in the appendix area. Rest is paramount if you suffer from appendicitis; don’t over exert yourself. Return to work or to school or whatever it is that usually do when you’re sure of yourself. Coughing may bring painful episodes in appendicitis patients so better support your stomach.

However, talking to your doctor before anything else will put you on safer footing. It’s better to discuss your condition with them first. It’s safer to deal with your appendicitis with your doctor’s full knowledge.

The Pain in Dysmenorrhea

Knowing its Causes and Treatment

Dysmenorrhea or pain during menstruation is one of the most common afflictions that affect women. For some it may only be a mild discomfort. However, for others, it can be a disabling condition. Pain in dysmenorrhea is often described as dull and cramping in the lower abdomen, particularly in the pelvic area and happens right before or during menstruation. The pain may be limited to the abdominal area or may radiate to other parts of the body particularly the lower back and thighs. Dysmenorrhea disappears in the latter of part of the menses or after taking analgesics such as NSAIDs.
Dysmenorrhea is caused by the contraction of the uterus during menstruation. The uterus is composed of three layers: the endometrium, the myometrium, and the perimetrium. During the menstrual cycle, the endometrium, the innermost layer, thickens and becomes highly vascularized in response to different hormones. Eventually, this layer gets sloughed off during menstruation. The myometrium, which is primarily made up of smooth muscles, contracts to help shed off the thickened layer. Sometimes the contractions are too strong, causing the pain associated with menstrual pain.
Abdominal pain is the most prominent symptom of dysmenorrhea. Often it is described as dull and aching; however some women also experience a crushing or stabbing pain. In many cases, this may be the only discomfort felt. However, in women with moderate to severe pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea may also happen. Pallor, clammy skin, and dizziness also occur, particularly in those who experience severe menstrual cramping. In a few cases, dehydration may also set in, causing weakness, dry lips, and thirst.
Causes of dysmenorrhea are varied. One of the most common causes includes hormonal imbalance and endometriosis, or the growth endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Fibroid growths, an over thickened endometrium, or the presence of contraceptive objects inside the uterus can also cause pain during menstruation. In a significant number of women, particularly adolescents, no exact cause for dysmenorrhea can be pinpointed. In many cases, pain during menstruation disappears once they enter their twenties or after giving birth. Dysmenorrhea is more likely to occur in women who have a family history of dysmenorrhea, those who have never been pregnant, those who smoke, and those who started menstruating at an early age. Dysmenorrhea at an older age is relatively uncommon and should be investigated for possible gynecological problems.
Dysmenorrhea can be easily managed at home. NSAIDS such as mefenamic acid are effective in controlling the pain. Rest, lower back massages, and warm compress have also been effective home remedies. Antispasmodics to relax the uterine muscles may also be administered alone or together with pain medications. In addition, oral contraceptive pills are often prescribed for those who suffer heavy and painful bleeding due to hormonal imbalance. These pills prevent ovulation and the oversecretion of certain hormones. For those who frequently experience severe unrelenting pain or have associated heavy menstrual bleeding, an ultrasound of the pelvic area is often requested to rule out any abnormal growths. Aside from medicines, surgery may be indicated for women who have uterine growths.

The Diverse Causes of Lower Abdominal Pain!

The Diverse Causes of Lower Abdominal Pain!

Liver, gall bladder, stomach, large intestine, small intestine, pancreas, appendix, muscles, tendons, connective tissues and uterus and Fallopian tubes for women are all lower abdominal organs. Anything that happens to these organs will cause lower abdominal pain. Some of these are located on the left side while the others are on the right side and will, therefore, cause lower left abdominal pain and lower right abdominal pain. There are also specific lower abdominal pain in men and lower abdominal pain in women. Lower left abdominal pain in women is getting a special mention because of their unique anatomical construction.

How does lower abdominal pain feel?
Different organs have different pain experiences. Lower abdominal pain will mostly make you double up and stretching your body will make the pain even worse. This is true with appendicitis; on that note, the most common pains are from the stomach. The pain can be dull, throbbing, stabbing pain. Pancreatic and gall bladder pain feels like squeezing, specifically if stone formations are present. Because of the presence of many lower abdominal organs it’s difficult to determine which organ is affected. It’s therefore advisable to see your doctor if the pain becomes intense, accompanied by vomiting or diarrhea.

Lower abdomen structure
On the right side of the lower abdomen are the liver, gallbladder, cecum, pancreas, appendix and parts of the stomach, large intestine, small intestine, anus, and rectum. On the left side are part of stomach, large intestine, small intestine, rectum and anus. The lower abdomen is divided into 4 quadrants which consist of the upper right, lower right, upper left, and lower left quadrants. Where the affected organs are is where the lower abdominal pain is.
What causes the lower abdominal pain?
The affected organs will bring the lower abdominal pain.
Liver cirrhosis
Pancreatitis
Appendicitis
Gall bladder stones
Gastrointestinal diseases
Tumors
Indigestion
Obstruction of the bile duct
Cancer
And a lot of other diseases make the lower abdominal area a hotbed of painful experiences because of the number of organs that are found in it. There’s no other part of the body most affected by pains than the lower abdomen because of the sheer number of organs found in it. Your vigilance every time there are bouts of lower abdominal pains is highly required. Vomiting, skin discoloration, eye discoloration; bloody stools, breathing difficulty, frequent painful urination, and diarrhea among others are some signs of serious illnesses.

What are some of the signs of lower abdominal pain?
Crohn’s disease causes lower left abdominal pain. This is a condition that affects the intestines.
Irritable bowel syndrome – this involves difficulty in bowel movement. This will also affect the left lower abdomen.
Appendicitis – this will cause lower right abdominal pain.
Constipation, trapped air, lactose intolerance- all in the digestive system are also causes of lower right abdominal pain.
Ectopic pregnancy and endometriosis are common lower abdominal pain in women.
Hernia and urinary tract infection are also the most common lower abdominal pain in men.
Ovarian cysts and menstrual pains are some of the lower left abdominal pain in women.
What are the common treatments for lower abdominal pain?
Drinking non- prescription antibiotics.
Taking antacids.
Hot compress
Applying a light massage on affected area
Stop eating highly oily foods
Taking a warm bath.
Sitting in warm water.
Refrain from drinking alcoholic drinks and soft drinks.
in any case you should Go to your doctor for a physical examination.

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